Therapeutic Lasers for veterinary use

August 12, 2016

Written by Dr. Peter H. Eeg, BSc, DVM, CVLF, FASLMS
Poolsville Veterinary Clinic

Therapeutic Lasers for Veterinary Use

Laser devices may also be used for bilateral tissue effect as therapeutic or surgical applications. 980 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths predominate in this dual modality. Diode wavelengths predominate overall in therapy applications with this technology.

Laser Classes include:

■ Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) are Class IIIB lasers that produce less than 500mW of energy. 

■ High-power laser therapy (HPLT), are generally class IV lasers, that produce greater than 500mW of energy.

Therapy lasers currently in use will emit one or more wavelengths in the infrared (635–1064 nm) range of light that is non-destructive to living tissues at the irradiances they are delivered at to the target tissue.

Generally, the spot size is focused from 10–25 mm up to 5 cm in diameter, with scanning devices allowing for larger total surface area inclusion.

Clinical research the use and cellular tissue effects of therapy lasers (Tunér and Hode, 1999) is providing increasingly compelling evidence that the effect of these wavelengths of laser energy on improving:

  • damaged cellular organelles and membranes,

  • increasing cellular respiration (ATP production),

  • enhancing damaged cell recovery rates,

  • altering pain initiation and transmission pathways,

  • modifying pain receptor responses, reducing pain,

  • increasing endorphin production,

  • enhancing intra and extracellular fluid movement to reduce edema and inflammation to the target tissues (Huang, Chen, Carroll, Hamblin, International Dose-Response Society, 2009).

Laser wavelength depth of penetration (different for each wavelength) along with time of application, mode of energy release (continuous, pulsed, synchronized, Q-switched) and total energy release at the targeted tissue appear to be the primary driving factor in the therapeutic tissue responses identified in current research. A bi-phasic curve response related to total energy release is a consistent finding in most recent clinical research presented at the 2011 ASLMS meeting in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas.

The entire concept is still being explored but has gained a significant following.

artemis_w_screen_shot_copy.png

Unlike surgical lasers (CO2 and 980 nm/1064nm Diode/contact mode devices) that have their full impact in the first 0.1mm to 5mm of tissue, therapy lasers can if appropriately modulated transmit their energy much deeper into tissue.   It is this ability of varying diode wavelengths to transmit energy up to 6 cm’s into tissue (1064 nm diode Q-switched devices) that gives therapeutic lasers such great potential to transfer energy uniformly to a predetermined area (cm2) of cells to promote improved damaged cellular function, reduce pain and pain transmission and limit edema and reduced circulatory flow to tissue.

There are a number of routine recommendations and considerations to keep in mind when you are preparing to implement therapeutic laser energy for bio modulation of tissue function and action into veterinary practice. Common sense and a general understanding of Diode laser wavelength physics will put the general practitioner or rehabilitation specialist in good stead for appropriate utilization of bio modulation of patient tissues.

Want more info on Laser Physics? Click Here

Regenerative medicine is an exciting field.  The ability to regrow damaged tissue in a healthy way would change medical care in a profound way. Technologies like stem cells and PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) therapies have had great promise, but have not really lived up to the hype.  Research shows mixed and meager results for all such therapies and the invasive and often very painful methods used for these therapies have hardly been worth it. Epica™ has developed a new therapy called NRT™ (Noninvasive Regenerative Therapy).  As the name suggests, NRT™ is a way to regenerate and even remodel already scarred tissue back to a normal healthy state completely non invasively, without pain or side effects but with tremendous efficacy.

Request More information  On Regenerative Therapy

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Therapeutic Lasers for veterinary use

Posted by Chrissy Laughlin on August 12, 2016
Chrissy Laughlin

Written by Dr. Peter H. Eeg, BSc, DVM, CVLF, FASLMS
Poolsville Veterinary Clinic

Therapeutic Lasers for Veterinary Use

Laser devices may also be used for bilateral tissue effect as therapeutic or surgical applications. 980 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths predominate in this dual modality. Diode wavelengths predominate overall in therapy applications with this technology.

Laser Classes include:

■ Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) are Class IIIB lasers that produce less than 500mW of energy. 

■ High-power laser therapy (HPLT), are generally class IV lasers, that produce greater than 500mW of energy.

Therapy lasers currently in use will emit one or more wavelengths in the infrared (635–1064 nm) range of light that is non-destructive to living tissues at the irradiances they are delivered at to the target tissue.

Generally, the spot size is focused from 10–25 mm up to 5 cm in diameter, with scanning devices allowing for larger total surface area inclusion.

Clinical research the use and cellular tissue effects of therapy lasers (Tunér and Hode, 1999) is providing increasingly compelling evidence that the effect of these wavelengths of laser energy on improving:

  • damaged cellular organelles and membranes,

  • increasing cellular respiration (ATP production),

  • enhancing damaged cell recovery rates,

  • altering pain initiation and transmission pathways,

  • modifying pain receptor responses, reducing pain,

  • increasing endorphin production,

  • enhancing intra and extracellular fluid movement to reduce edema and inflammation to the target tissues (Huang, Chen, Carroll, Hamblin, International Dose-Response Society, 2009).

Laser wavelength depth of penetration (different for each wavelength) along with time of application, mode of energy release (continuous, pulsed, synchronized, Q-switched) and total energy release at the targeted tissue appear to be the primary driving factor in the therapeutic tissue responses identified in current research. A bi-phasic curve response related to total energy release is a consistent finding in most recent clinical research presented at the 2011 ASLMS meeting in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas.

The entire concept is still being explored but has gained a significant following.

artemis_w_screen_shot_copy.png

Unlike surgical lasers (CO2 and 980 nm/1064nm Diode/contact mode devices) that have their full impact in the first 0.1mm to 5mm of tissue, therapy lasers can if appropriately modulated transmit their energy much deeper into tissue.   It is this ability of varying diode wavelengths to transmit energy up to 6 cm’s into tissue (1064 nm diode Q-switched devices) that gives therapeutic lasers such great potential to transfer energy uniformly to a predetermined area (cm2) of cells to promote improved damaged cellular function, reduce pain and pain transmission and limit edema and reduced circulatory flow to tissue.

There are a number of routine recommendations and considerations to keep in mind when you are preparing to implement therapeutic laser energy for bio modulation of tissue function and action into veterinary practice. Common sense and a general understanding of Diode laser wavelength physics will put the general practitioner or rehabilitation specialist in good stead for appropriate utilization of bio modulation of patient tissues.

Want more info on Laser Physics? Click Here

Regenerative medicine is an exciting field.  The ability to regrow damaged tissue in a healthy way would change medical care in a profound way. Technologies like stem cells and PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) therapies have had great promise, but have not really lived up to the hype.  Research shows mixed and meager results for all such therapies and the invasive and often very painful methods used for these therapies have hardly been worth it. Epica™ has developed a new therapy called NRT™ (Noninvasive Regenerative Therapy).  As the name suggests, NRT™ is a way to regenerate and even remodel already scarred tissue back to a normal healthy state completely non invasively, without pain or side effects but with tremendous efficacy.

Request More information  On Regenerative Therapy

Topics: NRT, Regnenerative therapy, Noninvasive Regenerative Therapy, Laser Therapy, Class IV Lasers, PRP, HILT